All about apples, pears, plums, and cherries - and orchards where they are grown

About this Cox's Orange Pippin Apple tree

Owner: Rebecca

Location:  Washington, United States

Age: Planted in about
Blossom: April
Picking: September
Soil characteristics at this location: Originally "hardpan" but deeply amended prior to planting and is now good deep Northwest (Washington) loam. 
Climate at this location: Damp, rainy winters, springs and late autumns. Summers tend to be getting hotter and drier but the "usual" is mild temps (70s) when it arrives in Jul
Pruning: Summer of every year, except dormant season in late winter 2008, only because I didn't get to it in summer of 2007
Tree form: Not sure
Height: Between 6ft / 2m and 15ft / 4m
Cropping: Heavy crops
Growth: This tree grows easily here
Herbicides: Manual treatment (hoeing and weeding)
Pesticides: Organic treatments
Local pests: Apple maggots and codling moth, severly. To the point that even though I treated regularly in summer of 2007, I lost almost my entire crop!

Owner's comments

We seem to be in the throws of an apple maggot epidemic here in the Puget Sound region of Washington state. I experimented with covering my apples using the apple maggot barriers sold by Raintree Nursery here in Washington, last year. What apples I was able to cover were fine. Unfortunately, I started on my other trees first and did not have enough to use on the Cox. This year I have covered what I could of them and had intended to knock the rest off as we are all thinking that if there are no apples available, either by being impenetrable via covers or just plain not there, that perhaps (hopefully) we can break this awful cycle with the maggots which are so destructive. Well, I didn't end up removing any apples and they look great (I have read where this tree can be prone to scab and we had the spring to bring it on and so far so good). I know that this can be deceiving and am waiting with baited breath for harvest time. My daughter's friend may end up with an entire crop of Cox to feed her cows again this year! I consider the Cox to be my "anchor" apple tree and would not want to be without it. I use it exclusively for applesauce, as is, no additives and it is extremely tasty, naturally sweet with hints of cinnamon. Oh, besides just eating out-of-hand. I grew up with an orchard planted circa 1896 and love "vintage" apples.

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