All about apples, pears, plums, and cherries - and orchards where they are grown

Arkansas Black Apple tree

Owner: Mark

Location:  Columbia Station, OHIO, United States

Age:Planted in about 1990
Age of this tree:31 years
Soil:Deep topsoil over heavier claylike soil 
Climate at this location:Typical northeastern Ohio; Zone 6
Pruning:Pruned
Tree form:Central leader (widest at bottom)
Height:Between 6ft / 2m and 15ft / 4m
Cropping:Medium crops
Growth:This tree grows easily here
Herbicides:Chemical treatments
Pesticides:Chemical treatments
Local pests:Japanese Beetles in season, scab

Owner's comments

I purchased my Arkansas Black tree from Stark Bros. Nursery in 1998. The apples from my tree are much larger than seen in photos on the Internet. Some weigh 1 lb. Most are a little smaller, but still what I call large. Overall they seem much larger than the published descriptions suggest. One apple will fill you up for sure. They do become deep red, they are long keepers, and they have, to my uneducated palate, the same taste and physical characteristics typically reported for this apple. I prefer their taste when they are just shy of ripe, when the flesh is still a bit white, and they have just a little more snap and crunch. One of these that I shared with a co-worker elicited this reaction: “That’s the best apple I ever ate!” When they are ripe, the flesh has changed to yellowish, and to me the taste isn’t quite as good. I prefer a tart apple, while my wife can hardly eat such apples, and will only eat sweet apples. Our Arkansas Blacks do well in pies, but not great, and do ok in sauce, but are better mixed with other apples. Although they are not a juicy apple, we mixed in some of their juice to make a blended sweet cider, which we made for the first time this year, and the result was well received, though a bit sweet for my taste—too many Golden Delicious. Our favorite pie apple is our Starkspur Golden Delicious. On the other hand, our Arkansas Black apples make excellent caramel apples—just had one a few nights ago and only have half a dozen remaining--and are much preferred by family and friends over the traditional Granny Smiths that are normally used.

Season records for this tree

  • 2013

    Canker: Not present
    Scab: Mild attack
    Mildew: Not present
    Fireblight: Not present
    Cedar-apple rust: Not present
    Woolly aphid: Not present
    Codling moth: Not present
    Plum fruit moth: Not present
    Silverleaf: Not present
  • 2012

  • 2011

    Heavy thinning pruning in March.
  • 2010

    Harvest: 1st week November
    Harvest from Oct. 20 to Thanksgiving.
  • 2009

Arkansas Black

Arkansas Black

Copyright: M. Rock, OH

Uploaded: 14 Apr 2011

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Arkansas Black tree, planted 1998, Ohio

Arkansas Black tree, planted 1998, Ohio

Copyright: M. Rock, OH

Uploaded: 14 Apr 2011

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